Collaborative practices: artists and architects

Inspiring, stimulating and entertaining: three collaborative partnerships presented their projects integrating art works with architectural design. The audience were delighted.

Architects for Health’s summer event showcased projects with artists, architects, consultancies and clients featuring Wunderkammer at Guy’s and St Thomas’ Charity by Sue Ridge and Nicky Crane ; new work by Jane Willis and Studio Weave in Bristol; and the Macmillan Cancer Centre at University College Hospitals NHS Trust (UCLH) by Guy Noble, Arts Coordinator and Sophy Twohig from Hopkins Architects.
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How can we do more with less?

How can we do more with less?

From within the inspiring modernist setting of the Royal College of Physicians’ library endowed with ancient books on subjects as diverse as mathematics and the universe, AfH together with the European Health Property Network explored how to sustain the quality of healthcare design with less money and importantly, less political will to spend freely. Speakers and delegates from across the UK and mainland Europe shared ideas, plans, built examples and visions. The event generated a challenging and provocative discussion with the sense that significant changes will need to happen to make this possible over the next decade.
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Designing for Impairment

AfH stepped onto Danish territory for their latest event: another informative and thought-provoking evening, sponsored by Guldmann and hosted by the Danish Ambassador, within the iconic Arne Jacobsen Danish Embassy.

Following the Ambassador’s welcome address -making reference to Denmark’s long history of and commitment to healthcare and caring environments- John Cooper, AfH chair, cited the Paralympics as the catalyst for this year’s AfH focus on “designing for impairment”.
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Sustainable Development Strategy for Health, Public Health and the Social Care System 2014-20

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY FOR HEALTH, PUBLIC HEALTH AND THE SOCIAL CARE SYSTEM 2014-20

CONSULTATION – OUT NOW – CLOSES 31 MAY 2013

The consultation on the Sustainable Development Strategy for the Health, Public Health and Social Care System 2014 – 2020 is now open and throughout February we have been raising awareness across the system – so apologies if you have already received information similar to this.

We are seeking input from across the whole healthcare system including NHS, Public Health, Social Care, CCG’s, Health and Wellbeing Boards, membership organisations and Local Authorities.
This is your opportunity to help shape the future of a truly sustainable health and care system we can all be proud of.
How to respond to the consultation
The consultation document, survey response form and background information can be found at www.sdu.nhs.uk/sds <http://www.sdu.nhs.uk/sds>
Alternatively you can

  • Submit your comments by e-mail to info@sdu.nhs.uk <mailto:info@sdu.nhs.uk>
  • Write to us at Sustainable Development Unit, Victoria House,      Capital Park, Fulbourn, Cambridge, CB21 5XB
  • Send us examples of best practice / case studies you feel should be      included in future thinking

Engaging your teams
We would like to encourage you to use this consultation as an opportunity to engage with your teams and networks.  We have developed some materials <http://www.sdu.nhs.uk/sustainable-health/engagement-resources/engagement-resources.aspx>  for you to use including:

    • A introduction to the consultation video by       Sonia Roschnik
    • A PowerPoint slide set
    • A number of workshop exercises

If you require any additional support please do let us know.
Spread the word
We would appreciate any help you can provide in cascading this information throughout your organisation and networks.  Actions such as:

    • Passing this e-mail to you communications teams       for inclusion in newsletters,       e-bulletins, websites etc
    • Ensuring your sustainability champion is aware
    • Forwarding this e-mail to your contacts

Thank you for your help.  Some background information is included below should you need it.
Regards
Charles Kitchin
On behalf of the Sustainable Development Unit

Background information

The sustainable development strategy will be the sustainable development plan for the health, public health and social care sector from 2014 – 2020. It will build on the NHS Carbon Reduction Strategy (2009), outlining practical steps that need to be taken to move the health system further on the journey towards sustainable healthcare delivery.

The purpose of this consultation and engagement process is to seek the views of the entire health and care system to help determine the future scope and approach of a sustainable development strategy that allows us to understand how and where to focus health and care sector efforts to deliver more financially, socially and environmentally sustainable care.

We refer to the whole system as  ‘health and care system’ which  includes all NHS services, services delivered on behalf of the NHS, social care, public health and health protection services,  and the interests covered by Health and Wellbeing Boards and their interface with the health and social care sector.

Key questions
The NHS Carbon Reduction Strategy (2009) focussed, as the title suggests, on the NHS and on carbon reduction.  Key questions for the new strategy are:
·         Should we widen the scope beyond the NHS to the wider social care and public health system
·         Should we widen the approach beyond carbon reduction to include other areas of sustainable development?
·         How ambitious should the strategy be?
In addition to these fundamental principles the consultation asks for views on:
·         What are the main priorities?
·         How should we measure progress?
·         What further areas of research are needed?

Design Council CABE are looking at how design can respond to the needs of an ageing population

Design Council CABE are looking at how design can respond to the needs of an ageing population.

They’ve held two Design Forums on the subject, bringing together some of the leading experts in the field to discuss the latest thinking on the built environment and products and services.

The audio recordings of the talks are on their website :

 

The Built Environment

Hear how our homes and public spaces can be improved.

http://www.designcouncil.org.uk/our-work/Insight/ageing-better-by-design/

 

Products & Services

Find how products and services can meet the needs of an ageing population.

<http://www.designcouncil.org.uk/our-work/Insight/ageing-better-by-design/products-and-services/>  of the five presentations are now available on their website.

Architects for Health at the IHEEM conference 2012

Architects for Health (AfH) organised  an excellent ‘conference within a conference’ at IHEEM in Manchester Central.

Entitled Designs on Health, AfH ran 4 sessions as part of the main conference programme. Three showcased good practice examples encompassing international, UK and interdisciplinary perspectives. A panel of experts from trusts and design practice further discussed how to encourage and achieve good design in the future.
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Designs on Health – AfH Exhibition Stand at IHEEM 2012

“Our most successful stand yet…described as the “jewel in the crown” of the Exhibition Hall.

The new format succeeded in showcasing members work, with informative and entertaining panels highlighting the aims and aspirations of Practices, Health Clients and of course,  Architects for Health. We were pleased to host many members on the stand and will be responding to all new membership and sponsorship enquiries received.

With our focus for the coming year covering topics including, designing for physical disability, bariatric design, neuro-rehab support, dementia and sensory impairment. We succeeded in tickling all the senses, visually the stand looked fantastic, the fox’s glacier fruits tasted great, our silent corner provided respite from the hubbub,  whilst offering the most comfortable seats in the house, courtesy of Hitch Mylius.  The sixth sense is in tune and say’s “submit next year to avoid disappointment” and avoid Clients asking you the question …”Where’s my scheme and why haven’t you submitted?”

Members who submitted entries for this year’s exhibition were not disappointed, together with having the opportunity of an award they all received the added bonus of their images being presented to the European Health Property Network (EuHPN) event in Copenhagen.

And so to the results of our “internationally judged competition” with. Gold, silver and bronze awards being presented in our Olympic year to:-

AfH Gold award 2012, BDP’s Alderhey Children’s Hospital AfH Silver award 2012, HLM’s Cynon Valley Community Hospital AfH bronze award 2012, P H + S’s Houghton-le-Spring Primary Care Centre

Our thanks go to Tye Farrow and John Cole for undertaking the judging, in what proved to be a broad range of entries.

A very successful event for all those involved, will you join in the fun next year?”

For this year exhibition of members projects see the gallery: http://www.architectsforhealth.com/iheem-2012/

Rosemary Jenssen, AfH Executive member

Peter Scher Obituary

It is a great sadness to announce the sudden death of Peter Scher.

Born in the Jewish East End, Peter was the only son of Isaac, an artist and Elizabeth, a seamstress. His grandparents, Israel and Leah had arrived in Britain in 1900 from Lithuania to build a better and safer life. Evacuated from London to a ‘safer` Sheffield (which was blitzed heavily on the night of their arrival!), Peter was awarded a scholarship to Christ Hospital Public School in 1943 where he excelled, and which nurtured and developed his lifelong interest in everything. At the age of seventeen he started his studies for an architecture degree at the Bartlett School of Architecture in the University of London. This was interrupted by his call-up to undertake National Service, which he refused as a conscientious objector. This resulted in him being posted as a hospital porter for two years, the loss of his right to vote for five years, and in  his never being able to serve on a jury. Continue reading