The Value of Landscaping on Health

The Value of Landscaping on Health; Facts, Therapy and Inspiration from UK and Japan
The Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation, Daiwa Foundation Japan House, 13/14 Cornwall Terrace, London
Presented by Architects for Health in association with The Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation.

Prior to the Event there was an opportunity to view the exhibition currently taking place at the Daiwa Foundation: Cross Currents – glasswork and ceramics by Keiko Mukaide and Simon Ward (23 May 2006 to 21 July 2006)

Chairman: Jeremy Barraud (Director of Programmes of The Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation)

Dr Clare Hickman (Art & History University of Bristol)
Landscape and the Mind: The Therapeutic Role of Landscape in Relation to the Nineteenth Century Lunatic Asylum Clare discussed the therapeutic use of later nineteenth asylum landscapes in relation to that of Brislington House. View some of the slides Clare used in her presentation.

Jane Stoneham (Sensory Trust)
The social therapeutic role of Landscape

Rose Moore (Blackthorn Trust)
The Blackthorn Medical Centre – The Therapeutic Garden Example / Experience View the slides Rose used in her presentation

David Buck (David Buck Landscape Architects)
East of the sun/west of the moon: cultural coordinates in Japanese landscapes

Takashi Sawano (Japanese Floral & Garden Designer)
Why are Japanese Gardens therapeutic? Takashi made two illustrative presentations: North East London Mental Health NHS Goodmays Hospital and Lauriston castle Japanese Garden Edinburgh, Scotland. View the slides Takashi used in his presentation

A Question and Answer Section then followed the presentation.


Presenters

Jeremy Barraud (Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation)
Jeremy is the Director of Programmes of the Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation which is the UK’s leading charity supporting links between Britain and Japan. The Foundation was established in 1988 with a generous benefaction from Daiwa Securities Co Ltd to support closer links between the UK and Japan. It carries out its work principally through the awarding of Daiwa Scholarships, grant-giving and a year-round programme of events.

http://www.dajf.org.uk

Dr Clare Hickman (Art & History University of Bristol)
Clare has completed a BSc in Human Sciences at University College London in 1997, and an MSc in Science Communication from Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine in 1998. Since returning to academia in 2002, Clare has successfully obtained a doctorate from the History of Art Department at Bristol University for her thesis entitled, Vis Medicatrix Naturae: The Design and Use of Landscapes in England for Therapeutic Purposes Since 1800. In May 2005 she won the first Garden History Society Essay Prize for her article entitled The ‘Picturesque’ at Brislington House: The Role of Landscape in Relation to the Treatment of Mental Illness in the Early Nineteenth-Century Asylum. Clare has also created and taught an optional unit for the MA Garden History course at Bristol University, which explored the social history of public open spaces from 1800.

http://www.bris.ac.uk/Depts/ArtHistory

Jane Stoneham (Sensory Trust)
Jane is Director of the Sensory Trust, a national organisation promoting and implementing inclusive and therapeutic environmental design. Her work has involved research, teaching, writing and running a consultancy business – a mix that proved particularly handy for setting up the Sensory Trust’s first national office in 1996. The Sensory Trust works with organisations like the Eden Project, Government agencies and local authorities to bring about change and to open up richer experiences for people. Jane’s interest in inclusive design and the social/therapeutic role of landscape was a key part of early work, and became a specialist focus. She is the author of several publications and lectures internationally on the subject. Her publications include ‘Landscape Design for Elderly and Disabled People’, the recent English Heritage guide ‘Easy Access to Historic Landscapes’ and ‘By All Reasonable Means’ for the Countryside Agency.

http://www.sensorytrust.org.uk

Rose Moore (Blackthorn Trust)
Rose studied conventional Natural Sciences (analytical) and later biodynamic farming and gardening (holistic). She worked in pioneering projects involving living and working with Nature. Rose has been gardener at Blackthorn for the last 14 years where work is the therapy and Nature the therapist.

http://www.blackthornmedicalcentre.nhs.uk

David Buck (David Buck Landscape Architects)
David studied urban design at Kobe University School of Architecture on a Japanese Education Ministry Scholarship and co-designed with Makoto Noborisaka a number of projects in Japan that explored how traditional concepts of landscape could be reconfigured for contemporary public spaces. His design work has been widely published, mostly recently in Modern Landscapes by Michael Spen, and he is the author of a book on Japanese design, titled ‘responding to chaos’.

http://www.db-land.com

Takashi Sawano (Japanese Floral & Garden Designer)
Takashi is Director of Japanese Floral & Garden Design. Since 1973 he has worked extensively throughout the UK and abroad as designer of Japanese gardens, large and small. His work can be seen in private homes, commercial developments, and public parks. He was the designer of the first Japanese garden in the NHS at North East London Mental Health Trust. Takashi tries to bring to his work a blend of experience of a Japanese-born and trained designer who has also immersed himself in the Western culture. Whilst his gardens are true to Japanese traditions, he adapts them to suit the climate, environment and materials of their particular setting. He is also a Master of Ikebana (the art of Japanese flower arranging) and teaches and demonstrates Ikebena in London, Oxford and Wales. He has exhibited for four years at the Chelsea Flower Show and has been awarded few Gold Medals. Takashi is the author of “Creating your own Japanese Garden “published by Shufunotomo Co Ltd.

http://www.members.aol.com/tsjfgd

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